Neurosurgery and Orthopaedic Spinal Surgery

Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery is a specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment, both surgical and non-surgical, of disorders of the nervous system and its coverings. This includes the brain, skull, spinal column, spinal cord and peripheral nerves (the nerves of the arms and legs). Neurosurgeons are required to treat a wide range of conditions affecting both the brain and spine in children and adults. These conditions include:

  • Head and spinal traumabrain 1
  • Brain and spinal tumours
  • Cerebral aneurysms and vascular abnormalities
  • Degenerative conditions of the spine causing back pain and/or leg pain from pinched nerves (sciatica), neck pain and/or arm pain from pinched nerves (brachialgia)
  • Movement disorder such as Parkinson’s Disease
  • Pituitary tumours and acoustic tumours
  • Chronic pain
  • Epilepsy
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Carpel Tunnel Syndrome and other peripheral nerve disorders

Orthopaedic Spinal Surgery

Orthopaedic surgeons are specialists in diagnosis and preoperative, operative and post-operative treatment of diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system. Orthopaedic surgeons are able to sub-specialise in spinal surgery after they complete their Fellowship with the Royal Australian College of Surgeons (RACS), and enter into a Spinal Fellowship with the Australian Orthopaedics Association. Orthopaedic spinal surgeons can treat a wide range of conditions affecting both spine and peripheral nerve in children and adults. Spinal_NeurosurgeryThese conditions include:

  • Spinal disorders
  • Arthritis
  • Sports injuries
  • Trauma
  • Bone Tumours
  • Hand injuries and deformities
  • Total Joint Replacement
  • Degenerative conditions of the spine causing back pain and/or leg pain from pinched nerves (sciatica), neck pain and/or arm pain from pinched nerves (brachialgia)

Spinal Surgery

Dr YangBrizBrain & Spine started out with five neurosurgeons and recently recognised the increasing need for skills that an orthopaedic spinal specialist can bring to the clinic. Two orthopaedic spinal surgeons subsequently joined the group in recent years to compliment the skills that our current neurosurgeons have. On average neurosurgeons will see more patients with spinal conditions than brain conditions, due to the prevalence of each condition.

The main difference between an orthopaedic spinal surgeon and neurosurgeon is that an orthopaedic spinal surgeon tends to treat paediatric and adult scoliosis and other spinal deformities, whereas neurosurgeons are specialists in treating conditions affecting the spinal canal including spinal cord tumours, Chiari malformation and spina bifida. Both specialists are adept at performing cervical, thoracic, and lumbar surgery, including spinal cord and nerve decompression, spinal fusion, microsurgery and minimally-invasive spine surgery.

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